31 Dover

I wrote recently about a wine that seemed completely underpriced. Below is an excerpt from my latest Lady column with some more wines from the same people. From my admittedly limited tasting of their range, I’d say they offer much better quality and value than Laithwaite’s. They’re almost up there with the mighty Wine Society.

We’re on one of my periodic economy drives as we’re saving so that my daughter can go to the nursery school of her dreams. It means drinking cheaper wine. I’m coping manfully but my wife is not happy. So it was a relief to be sent some samples from new(ish) mail order merchant, 31 Dover. It was partly the name that sounds like a Mayfair art gallery, and partly the quality of the wines, but I assumed that they were all out of our price range. Yet when I looked up the prices online I was amazed. Almost everything we tried was a good third less than I thought it would be. It looks as if we are going to be able to drink well and afford an education for our daughter:

Château Grand Tayac, Margaux 2007, £13.99
You simply don’t find mature Margaux for under £20 a bottle. I’m baffled it’s so cheap. It’s classic light vintage claret with green peppers, herbs, leather and tobacco.

Sara & Sara Friulano 2010, £9.49
A very unusual wine: it smells of honeysuckle and it has the most amazing texture. It’s oily but with a great tang to it and a long nutty finish. It won’t be for everyone but I think it’s rather special.

Damien & Romain Bouchard Chablis Broc de Biques 2012, £14.49
Now for one that I think everyone will like. It’s classic Chablis but in a riper style than you might be used to, with some very discrete oak.

Read the full column here.

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About Henry

Henry Jeffreys was born in London. He has worked in the wine trade, publishing and is now a freelance journalist. He specialises in drink and his work has appeared in the Spectator, the Guardian, the Economist, the Financial Times, the Oldie and Food & Wine magazine. He was a contributor to the Breakfast Bible (Bloomsbury 2013) and his book Empire of Booze: British History through the Bottom of a Glass was published in November 2016.
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